Vitamins and Interactions

Vitamins are good for you, so it stands to reason that getting all the vitamins you can everyday is the best course of action. As a general rule, it’s true that choosing foods rich in vitamins is a good idea. But there are times when more isn’t better, even when it comes to vitamins.

The first thing to keep in mind is that several vitamins have toxic levels. In other words, there is a point at which consuming more vitamins is not only unhelpful, it can be dangerous.

Vitamin K helps the body clot blood. If you get a cut, your blood’s natural tendency to clot will keep you from bleeding to death. But there are some people who have blood that clots too readily, or who have health issues that require thinner blood. Some people with specific types of heart problems may actually be on medication designed to thin the blood. Doctors may also prescribe a blood thinner for a patient getting ready for some types of surgeries. If thinning the blood is your doctor’s goal, taking a Vitamin K supplement or eating foods that are particularly rich in Vitamin K may be dangerous.

If you’re taking an aspirin each day, your body may be experiencing a Vitamin C deficiency. Studies have indicated that Vitamin C is typically absorbed by blood cells, but aspirin in the system may block this normal absorption action.

If you need more iron in your body, you may want to consider increasing the amount of Vitamin C in your daily food intake. It seems that having enough Vitamin C in your system makes your body more readily absorb iron, tackling that anemia problem more quickly than taking iron alone.

If you’re taking antibiotics, particularly over a long period of time, your body may have trouble absorbing sufficient amounts of Vitamin A. If you’re taking drugs to lower your cholesterol, you may also experience Vitamin A deficiency.

Vitamin E and Zinc work hand-in-hand. If your body has lower-than-normal levels of Zinc, you may also have a Vitamin E deficiency, even if you’re eating healthy. Vitamins C and E also work together.

There are a number of other interactions that can occur between vitamins, or between vitamins and other conditions, minerals and drugs. Remember that it is possible to overdose on some vitamins, and some can cause serious problems with medication, diet and existing health problems. It’s best to talk to a health care professional before you start or alter your daily diet or vitamin intake.

Four Main Factors Causing High Cholesterol

Besides diet, other causes of high cholesterol are lifestyle, gender and the heritage of the individual.

For some, even maintaining cholesterol at the right levels and being fit and thin will still not prevent the development of high levels of bad cholesterol. Due to heart risk factors besides diet, some people require a very aggressive approach which includes cholesterol lowing medication.

Lifestyle issues and high cholesterol:

  • When we opt for convenience in eating over nutrition, we are setting ourselves up for problems. Eating fast foods and convenience foods results in eating too many fats and salts, which can raise our bad cholesterol levels. In addition, a more sedentary lifestyle also contributes to unhealthy levels of cholesterol. If you want to see a graphic representation of this, consider renting the documentary movie “Supersize Me.” This documentary details the attempts of one man to live on fast foods and little exercise alone. The results on his cholesterol and body health in just 30 days are truly frightening.
  • A visit to a nutritionist or dietician can help us all better understand eating for the right reasons and for optimal health. It is never too late to start on this path.
  • Regular exercise will effectively lower cholesterol and will maintain your body strength to function best. Just 20 minutes of aerobic exercise, including walking, each day will lower cholesterol. Exercise does not have to be a large time or money commitment. Simple activities that get you moving and that you enjoy enough to repeat are almost always adequate.

Diet:

  • An important consideration in eating is choosing lower fat.
  • Buy cooking oils that are unsaturated. Use low fat cooking sprays to replace heavy oils whenever possible. Reduce your overall use of oils even further by using cooking techniques that require little or no oil.

Age and Gender:

  • Cholesterol levels increase with age. Women generally have a lower level than men from age 50 to 55. Once a woman starts menopause, the cholesterol level starts to increase.
  • While there is not much that you can do about your age, you can make sure that age does not threaten your heart health by sticking to a healthy lifestyle and diet and by getting your cholesterol levels monitored.

Heritage:

  • Genetics play a key role in a person’s health and this includes the amount of cholesterol you might have.
  • Find out if your family battles with high levels of cholesterol and then bring this to your doctor’s attention right away. If you have a family history of heart disease and high cholesterol levels, work harder and start earlier in adopting a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.